What is your biggest fear ?

There is a litany of Scriptures counselling us against fear. Scriptures like:

“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.” Matthew 6:34. And: “Do not worry about your life, what you will eat; or about your body, what you will wear. Life is more than food, and the body more than clothes.

Consider the ravens: They do not sow or reap, they have no storeroom or barn, yet God feeds them. And how much more valuable you are than birds! Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life? Since you cannot do this very little thing, why do you worry about the rest?” Luke 12:22-26, are among some of the most quoted ones.

Still, despite the positive energy those Scriptures emit, everybody has fears. And, depending on one’s priorities, fear can either be spiritual or temporal. And sometimes both.

According to my dictionary, “Fear is a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger, evil, pain, whether real or imagined”.

Honestly, my biggest fear is spiritual. And it has to do with Jesus’ return, and I am not ready. There is no one among us who can predict the future. One could be in a state of readiness today, and the Bridegroom returns tomorrow and you are not ready.

Everybody remembers the parable of the ten virgins Jesus told His disciple on the Mount of Olives. (Matthew 25:1-13). The only reason the five foolish virgins did not meet the Bridegroom was because they ran out of oil. And it could happen to you.

What is your biggest fear?

It’s a wonderful life.

It’s a wonderful life
Christians are not immune from ills and perils. We are human beings. Pain and suffering, disappointment and setbacks are all part of life’s journey. But, despite our troubles, the Christian life is wonderful.

What makes the Christian life wonderful?
I cannot quite put into words why the Christian life is wonderful. Neither can a professional basketball player explains how he made fifteen three-pointers in a row in one and in another game he made zero; nor can a professional golfer explains how he made a hole-in-one. But there is something about living a Christian life that makes one feel wonderful.

Naturally, naysayers, like atheists, will say you are crazy. And every time a tragedy happens they put you on the spot and ask you questions they know you will never answer to their satisfaction. Questions like, Where was God when this or that happened?. Why did he allow so and so to happen? And instead of saying I do not know, some Christians pretend to know the mind of God and conjure up answers that do not make practical sense.

But, I do not know the mind of God. And I cannot explain why bad things happen to good people, but I know without a doubt the Christian life is overwhelmingly wonderful. And to experience it you must be born again.

A tribute to the late Andrae Crouch


Legendary gospel singer/songwriter, Andrae Crouch passed away on Thursday January 8, 2014. He was 72.

Crouch was a remarkable gospel singer. His music has touched the lives of many people around the world.

The Recording Academy awarded him with seven Grammys during a career that spanned more than a half-century.

He wrote his first song at age 14. Some of his more well-known songs are “Soon and very soon,” The blood will never lose its power,” To God be the glory,” and my favorite, “Through it all.”

May his soul rest in peace.

New day, New beginning

Happy New Year everybody!

024“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was at the beginning with God. All things have been made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it” (John 1:1-5).

I would like to take a little time to thank all of you for your continued support of this blog. You guys have been simply awesome–beyond measure.

Even though we may not always agree on every point; we treat each other with respect. I wish the greater society on the whole would take a page out of our books.

I pray that the God of Abraham will continue to inspire you to inspire and lead others to Christ.

The Christmas Story – Music by Michael W. Smith

Mary, a virgin, living in Galilee of Nazareth was engaged to Joseph, a Jewish carpenter. One day God sent an angel, Gabriel to inform her that she would conceive a son by the power of the Holy Spirit. She would carry and give birth to this child, and she would name him Jesus.

At first Mary was afraid and troubled. Being a virgin, Mary questioned the angel, “How will this be?” The angel explained that the child would be God’s Son and, therefore, “nothing is impossible with God.” Humbled and in awe, Mary believed the angel of the Lord and rejoiced in God her Savior.

While Mary was still engaged to Joseph, she miraculously became pregnant through the Holy Spirit. When Mary told Joseph she was pregnant, he felt betrayed and disgraced. He knew the child was not his own. Under Jewish law, Mary could be put to death by stoning.

Although Joseph’s initial reaction was to break the engagement, he treated Mary with extreme kindness. He did not want to cause her further shame, so he decided to act quietly. But God sent an angel to Joseph in a dream to verify Mary’s story and reassure him that his marriage to her was God’s will. The angel explained that the Holy Spirit conceived the baby within Mary and that his name would be Jesus the Messiah. When Joseph woke from his dream, he obeyed God and took Mary home to be his wife.

In Mary’s third trimester, Caesar Augustus decreed that a census must be taken, of every person living in the Roman world. Joseph, a descendant of David, was required to go to Bethlehem to register with Mary. While in Bethlehem, Mary gave birth to Jesus in a stable. There was no room in the inn. She wrapped the baby in cloths and placed him in a manger.

Out in the fields, an angel of the Lord appeared to the shepherds who were tending their sheep by night. The angel announced that the Savior’s birth in the town of David. Suddenly a great host of heavenly beings appeared with the angels and began singing praises to God. As the angelic beings departed, the shepherds decided to travel to Bethlehem and see the Christ-child.

There they found Mary, Joseph, and the baby, in the stable. After their visit, they began to spread the word about this amazing child and everything the angel had said about him. They went on their way still praising and glorifying God. But Mary kept quiet, treasuring their words and pondering them in her heart.

After Jesus’ birth, Herod was king of Judea. At this time wise men (Magi) from the east saw a star, they knew the star signified the birth of Christ. So they followed the star to Jerusalem where they asked the Jewish rulers where the Christ born. The rulers explained, “In Bethlehem in Judea,” referring to Micah 5:2.

Herod secretly met with the Magi and asked them to report back after they had found the child. Herod told the Magi that he too wanted to go and worship the babe. But secretly Herod was plotting to kill the child.
So the wise men continued to follow the star in search of the new born king and found Jesus with his mother in Bethlehem. They bowed and worshiped him, offering treasures of gold, incense, and myrrh. When they left, they did not return to Herod. The Holy Spirit warned them of his plot to destroy the child.