Belief

Should you Ignore your troubles and trust God?


We will never fully understand how God works. But you can rest assured that he always works in our best interest.

So often, situations occur in our lives against our expectations that we do not understand. And we get upset and even frustrated with God. But, little did we know that what seems unfavorable today is preparing us for a great experience tomorrow.

Job, one of the fathers of Faith, did not fully understand how God works either. But he was a faithful servant of God; even at the darkest moments in life and against the advice of those closest to him, he refused to blame God for his predicament.

So, my friends, the next time tribulation confronts you, look on the bright side or the bigger picture. For, “I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love.

No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 8:38-39).

God would never give you an impossible task


Sometimes God directs us down paths that seem impossible, but if you think outside the box, we’ll see that God is prompting us to kickstart our creative juices. For example, in my neck of the woods, I learned an old saying as a child: “If a man hates you, he will give you a basket to fetch water.” At first glance, it would appear futile to bring water in a basket. But with a bit of creativity, you realize that getting water in a basket is not impossible.
There are examples in the Bible of great men who scoffed at God’s instructions because they thought the tasks were impossible. For instance, Jonah refused to go to Nineveh, and Moses tried to talk his way out of going down to Egypt. But they later learned that God would never give you an assignment unless he equips you with the necessary tools to do the job. Hence, with Christ, all things are possible.

Do Christians, especially the right, fear the LBGTQ community?


It seems to me it is appropriate to ask whether Christians, in general, fear the LBGTQ community. So many of us who stand behind pulpits and sit in pews often leave no stone unturned when it comes to spitting ridicules and innuendos at a society that embraces different sexual preferences than ours. Don’t judge me. I am not an advocate for this group, but all of them are human beings like any one of us, who is free to do whatever they see fit.

We spend far too much time condemning sinners when we should spend more time winning souls for Jesus. If you call yourself a follower of Jesus, you should do as He had done when He walked the earth. He said He came to call sinners. Not the other way around. Jesus was not confrontational, except when He called out the Pharisee. Other than that, He was largely welcoming.

For example, when a group of lawmen brought a woman to Him whom they claim they caught committing adultery and insisted that the law said she should get pommel with stones until she was dead. Jesus did not side with the men and condemned the woman. Instead, He said. Let him cast the first stone if there is one, among you without sin. And to the woman, He said, go your way and sin no more. Essentially, Jesus calmly told both parties to go and clean up their lives.

We should control our emotions and allow the Word of God to do the condemning. After all, the Bible says all of us sinned and fallen short of God’s glory. Therefore, there is no reason to be fearful because God is in control. He has given us choices-the wide and narrow paths. Each man’s reward will get calculated based on the course he took. That is the reason Jesus asked us to allow the wheat and the tare to remain together until the harvest. Furthermore, our sacred duty is to preach the gospel to all people.

Do You Love Your Neighbor As Yourself?


“Love your neighbor as yourself” is one of the most well-known quoted Scripture of the bible. But it is also one of the most misinterpreted.

Do you love your neighbor as yourself?

It seems that loving your neighbor as yourself is quite a difficult thing to do. And I do not think that is what Jesus meant. I don’t know about you. But I do not know anyone who is that generous with their love.

So if you doubted whether you interpreted the Scripture above correctly, don’t worry because Luke wrote it down as he heard it in Luke 10:25-37

25 One day, an authority on the law stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to receive eternal life?”

26 “What is written in the Law?” Jesus replied. “How do you understand it?”

27 He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and soul. Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.’ (Deuteronomy 6:5) And ‘render help to those who are in need. (Leviticus 19:18)

28 “You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do that, and you will live.”

29 But the man wanted to make himself look good. So he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho. Robbers attacked him. They stripped off his clothes and beat him. Then they went away, leaving him almost dead. 31 A priest happened to be going down that same road. When he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32 A Levite also came by. He passed by on the other side when he saw the man.

33 But a Samaritan came to the place where the man was. When he saw the man, he felt sorry for him. 34 He went to him, poured olive oil and wine on his wounds, and bandaged them. Then he put the man on his donkey. He brought him to an inn and took care of him.

35 The next day, he took out two silver coins. He gave them to the owner of the inn. ‘Take care of him,’ he said. ‘When I return, I will pay you back for any extra expense you may have.’

36 “Which of the three do you think was a neighbor to the man who was attacked by robbers?”

37 The authority on the law replied, “The one who felt sorry for him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do as he did.”